Archive for the ‘CSS’ Category

h1

Make that “…a GREASED pig”.

2007-03-12

I’ve managed to wrestle several XSLT stylesheets into — well, not submission exactly, but grudging respect.  I’m starting to make visible structural changes to the HTML components of HIP.

OK, so the SunCat 2.0 development server isn’t nearly as pretty as the mockup, but this time the lipstick, smeared as it may be, is on a real pig and not just a piggy bank.

And, yes, I’m aware that the UN Commission on Eliminating the Torture of Metaphors has been trying to reach me all day.  But I’ve been coding, darn it.  They can wait.

h1

CODI 2006: Shelly Neville’s presentation on Information Portal 8.x

2006-10-07

I’m posting this in Atlanta, having forgotten to post earlier. (Uploading 500MB of photos to Flickr takes a while, especially since the Little America hasn’t got an OC-48, and Flock kept losing its connection until about 1:30am. For all the wonders of Web 2.0, I’d have loved to be able to just use ssh, ftp, or even Xmodem-CRC.

There was a question about library-supplied images in combination with Syndetics images; Shelly pointed out that it would be rare to have both kinds of images for the same record, but that you could check boxes on a config screen to modify the layout. I said that you could also use XSLT to display the Syndetics image only if there’s no locally-provided image — just change the stylesheet.

Shelly laughed and said: “Any time a technical person says ‘you can just change the stylesheet’, I worry. I can *spell* XSL and that’s about it.”

You can use location groups to show “local copies”, “other libraries within 20 miles”, “other libraries further away”, etc.; the user would see the first group’s holdings and use a drop-down menu (or a similar control) to choose a different view.

(I hope there’ll be a way to use checkboxes to do something similar — perhaps “just change the stylesheet” to introduce some code that would display each group in a div and then show or hide the divs as the user toggles ‘public libraries’, ‘Pinellas County’, and so on. Heck, there’s an AJAX way to use a slider to say how far away you’re willing to go, but that might not actually be *useful*, just cool.)

Speaking of stylesheets, CSS will be used for layout, so there’s a good chance that the layout could be radically improved without messing around in XSLT.

Language translations will be stored in customer-accessible resource bundles, so we can create a Greek translation, or tweak a Spanish translation to reflect local usage. (Or even make the PAC say ‘your mailing address needs updated’, if that’s how normal people talk in your area.)